Author Topic: What camera to use?  (Read 18661 times)

Maidenscombe

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Re: What camera to use?
« Reply #15 on: April 14, 2012, 12:12:41 pm »
Thanks for that, I'm currently looking at making a short that will be called The 2J ghost train. I will need to make a recording of the 'ghost train'. As other parts of the short require a reporter, having a hand held microphone will be needed. I may as well get a recording unit, separate from the camera.
Rode microphone's seem to be used in the music industry a fair bit, which might make them more suitable to record the sounds of a goods train. I don't know how long they are near Bristol, but here the longest I have heard took 2 minutes and 10 seconds to pass by (last week). Lots of metal to metal sounds to record, plus near here is an unmanned crossing, the ringing bell warning sound is good as is the horn blast from the train.
A train can look impressive, having three locomotives to pull it.

Felek

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Re: What camera to use?
« Reply #16 on: April 14, 2012, 04:26:19 pm »
Of course, it introduces the requirement to synchronise audio and if you're doing simple stuff it might be a little OTT, but after having issues last week trying to record audio to two different DSLRs I would recommend considering it.

http://www.singularsoftware.com/pluraleyes.html

PluralEyes is a godsend for syncing audio!


Felek Werpachowski
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Maidenscombe

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Re: What camera to use?
« Reply #17 on: April 15, 2012, 03:44:15 am »
Nice one, thanks.

Rich

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Re: What camera to use?
« Reply #18 on: April 17, 2012, 11:32:49 pm »
Rode microphone's seem to be used in the music industry a fair bit, which might make them more suitable to record the sounds of a goods train. I don't know how long they are near Bristol, but here the longest I have heard took 2 minutes and 10 seconds to pass by (last week). Lots of metal to metal sounds to record, plus near here is an unmanned crossing, the ringing bell warning sound is good as is the horn blast from the train.
A train can look impressive, having three locomotives to pull it.

Hmm... if you're trying to go with more environmental sounds (such as the sound of a train going past), you may want to pick a microphone that picks up a wide field rather than a shotgun mic (which only picks up well for whatever you're pointing at it).

Ignoring that quibble, however, the NTG-2 is a very good choice for a microphone. Once I've saved up my pennies, that's what I'm potentially buying (the mic we have, an HTDZ HT-81, is excellent quality for the price but it does have its flaws such as a little bit of hiss and a tendency to pick up unwanted noise). I see a lot of people using DSLRs go for the Rode VideoMic, which is also very good, mounts directly on the camera and has a built in amplifier, but once you expand into having a boom pole it becomes scrap. Also, it's good to buy from an Aussie company! :D

I'd also suggest purchasing the three basic essentials at some point: a good windshield if you're going to film outside (for example: the Rode WS6), a good mount (preferably one that has a shockmount to reduce movement & cable noise getting in the way of the sound) and, once you move up to it, a lightweight non-flexible boom pole - believe me, a light boom pole is a godsend!

Good luck!

Maidenscombe

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Re: What camera to use?
« Reply #19 on: April 18, 2012, 12:00:38 am »
After looking at several pictures of sound people holding the boom for the microphone I was horrified. What a stupid concept I thought.
A good sound recording is usually so vital for a film, so having a mike hand held is a dumb idea. To get a constant recording level a fixed microphone would be so much better. Make use of a light reflector to keep the wind noise to a minimum.
As for doing the recording of a train, it would be done at night as there is a lot fewer other sounds that will affect it. Also as the sound carries really well the microphone can be set back to 20 or 30 yards and just get the sounds from a certain length of rail. As the time spent going past a certain area can be over 2 minutes, cutting out a lot of the trains noises will be beneficial.
At 3 am I can hear the train coming about 6 miles away, this is a hilly terrain so the noise travels along the valleys, it also echoes from various other hills. So the shotgun type mike suits this area.

My main problem will be getting a good set up for the mike as there isn't anywhere less than 2000 miles away that supplies these items. My idea will be to fix the boom pole to a tripod. By using the contraption that holds the mike to fix the boom pole to the tripod (somehow) the sound reproduction can be much better. There are some stands for boom poles but they are crap and more suited for table top situations.

Rich

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Re: What camera to use?
« Reply #20 on: April 19, 2012, 11:13:48 pm »
After looking at several pictures of sound people holding the boom for the microphone I was horrified. What a stupid concept I thought. A good sound recording is usually so vital for a film, so having a mike hand held is a dumb idea.

In the case of your static shot: yes, by all means mount it on something - either as a separate microphone stand (such as the kind singers use) or as a 'shoe mount' (as in, mounted on the flash shoe) on the top of your camera. Both are both inexpensive and easy to use.

Of course the best strategy is to have it static, but in most cases of film shooting, actors move, different people talk, camera angles show areas you'd stand a microphone, etc. - which is why boom poles exist. They allow you to get the microphone close to the actors and yet still mobile enough to cover more than one person.

To stop the noise of hands and movement, most mountings for shotgun microphones, both to go on a boom pole or be hand-held, have one of these rubbery things on them:
- it's a shock mount that prevents/reduces the noise of handling. More professional ones use rubber bands to essentially 'float' the microphone so that knocks and movement don't affect it. As you can understand, with one of those you hardly suffer the issues you'd expect from using a shotgun microphone hand-held.

Quote
Make use of a light reflector to keep the wind noise to a minimum.

You could try that, although I wouldn't suggest it. Unless you're really careful, you could find your audio becoming distorted (akin to holding an umbrella or holding your hand close to your ear), you will get thump and rustle as the wind catches the light reflector and unless you're fortunate enough to have the wind always blow from the same direction you'll have to keep moving it. As I said, I strongly suggest a fluffy microphone windshield if you're working outdoors as microphones are highly sensitive to wind. (I have this one, a Rode WS6:)

I'd also suggest avoiding foam ones unless you're working somewhere where there's low chance of wind or there are natural windbreaks (such as trees, buildings, a news reporter etc.) - most microphones come with them but they

Hope that's useful information.

Maidenscombe

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Re: What camera to use?
« Reply #21 on: April 20, 2012, 03:05:48 am »
I just went outside to time a passing goods train, it was passing here for 4 minutes and 35 seconds. Admittedly it was a bit slower than usual, probably due to the speed it went throught the station a mile back. But the sounds it created, they were fantastic, just what I want. I Wish I'd had a decent microphone set up to record it.

Maidenscombe

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Re: What camera to use?
« Reply #22 on: August 07, 2012, 01:01:14 am »
So there I was, standing in the location of where the first scene was to be shot. I had gone there on a dry run, just to make sure there were no unforseen problems. And good thing too, an unforseen problem reared its ugly head. The LCD screen on the camera began to accept all the daylight on the screen, so I couldn't see what I was looking at.
I tried to think of ways to avoid the glare on the LCD screen, my thoughts were of the first camera's. Of how the camera operator would shroud him/ herself in a black cover.
What ways do you guys stop the glare on the LCD screen?

mysticjim

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Re: What camera to use?
« Reply #23 on: August 12, 2012, 10:38:43 pm »
My suggestion would be hooking up one of these;

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Mini-3-5-Inch-TFT-LCD-Color-Screen-Car-Rearview-Monitor-Free-Shipping-UK-Stock-/270988430120?pt=UK_In_Car_Technology&hash=item3f182b4b28

to your camera.  You've got a 2nd screen independent of the camera, so potentially you can look at what the camera is seeing while tilting the screen to avoid direct sunlight onto the screen.  You could also fit some kind of improvised sun visor to the portable scr

Maidenscombe

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Re: What camera to use?
« Reply #24 on: August 12, 2012, 11:04:49 pm »
Thanks for that mysticjim,
I received an e-mail yesterday from Team Digital, a camera shop in Perth. There is a proper fitting for the camera I have. It costs $9.
And there was me thinking of a black piece of cloth to cover part of the camera and me, a bit like the first portrait camera operators used.

Rich

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Re: What camera to use?
« Reply #25 on: August 14, 2012, 12:24:48 am »
Thanks for that mysticjim,
I received an e-mail yesterday from Team Digital, a camera shop in Perth. There is a proper fitting for the camera I have. It costs $9.

Yes, an LCD hood is a far more practical solution for your problem! :D

Maidenscombe

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Re: What camera to use?
« Reply #26 on: May 07, 2013, 11:58:11 pm »

Rich

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Re: What camera to use?
« Reply #27 on: May 13, 2013, 09:21:16 pm »
Manfrotto Fluid Head Shootout

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HnBxu7STmag&feature=fvwp&NR=1

Manfrottos are really nice tripods. I believe all the ones I've used have had 501 heads, which are rock solid for the job.