Author Topic: The best vampire in a film  (Read 8967 times)

Maidenscombe

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The best vampire in a film
« on: September 30, 2011, 12:02:09 am »
Who do you think looks the best vampire?

I choose Queenie by Dimitri Coats in the film Suck.

Maidenscombe

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Re: The best vampire in a film
« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2011, 11:06:22 pm »
On 'You Tube' the song is Flesh and Bone.
His eyes are really efective.

Rich

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Re: The best vampire in a film
« Reply #2 on: October 09, 2011, 12:15:54 pm »
Haven't seen Suck yet, waiting for it to turn up on the movie channels.

The best looking vampire? Hmm, pretty difficult question, especially trying to look past the acting and more towards the actual visual appearance.

In terms of classic vampire style, it's hard to beat Christopher Lee in the Hammer Horror series of Dracula films:



I haven't seen the Gary Oldman version for a while, but I never really considered him that highly in comparison.

In regards to more modern interpretations of vampires, I like the visual style of the Underworld series of movies (although some people here dislike it on story):





The only other vampire film that I can remember as visually striking was Daybreakers:



I'm sure more will come to mind, but those are my current 3 picks.

Maidenscombe

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Re: The best vampire in a film
« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2011, 10:23:23 pm »
I do have one big problem with that picture of Christopher Lee, where are his vampire teeth?

Ever noticed that the modern vampires tend to have blood all over their chins after biting someone?
I blame the vampires upbringing, obviously mummy and daddy vampire didn't install polite 'table' manners. Also, with that line of thought, generally with most vampires they get very interested at the mere hint of a bit of blood. So why let waste it by letting it cover their chins?

About the film Suck, I bought the DVD a few months back.   

Rich

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Re: The best vampire in a film
« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2011, 08:28:31 pm »
I do have one big problem with that picture of Christopher Lee, where are his vampire teeth?

Just a bad picture I'm afraid - you can see his teeth but they aren't very obvious in the angle of the picture.

Here's some better examples of him playing Dracula (the middle picture is from Dracula A.D. 1972, but the other two are from the first film IIRC):



Quote
Ever noticed that the modern vampires tend to have blood all over their chins after biting someone?

It's not really a modern idea - Hammer's Dracula was made 54 years ago, and yet showed him as a blood-sucking neer-do-well.

Quote
why let waste it by letting it cover their chins?

I would assume that there's only so much blood they can ingest at a time (much like a person drinking any liquid). Because there is no 'valve' and the jugular vein tends to be quite highly pressurised, I would expect at least some leakage. You are right though, as films have grown more gory the propensity for excess blood has increased from maybe once a film to every. single. time.

Maidenscombe

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Re: The best vampire in a film
« Reply #5 on: October 11, 2011, 12:10:14 am »
As in the first piccy of Draccy-poos, the teeth are quite small. A bit like the ones that Caroline has (The Vampire Diaries). If you freeze frame the scene where Caroline reveals she is a vampire to Tyler the Dog Boy, you can see the teeth are stuck on.
Thinking about the act of drinking blood, when the vampire bites a neck, the vampires head is side on to the neck. Any excess blood from the wound should, according to the laws of gravity, go across the vampires face to its ear, not down its chin.
The bite itself consists of two puncture wounds, which would indicate the blood is sucked up into the teeth.

The different types of teeth placement on a vampire was mainly due to, if the vampire had any lines to say the use of enlarged frontal teeth make it difficult to talk clearly.

In The Vampire Diaries, when Stefan is getting the cure for Damon, Stefan drinks eight blood packs. Even if a pack has one pint, how many times do you think he'd need to go to the 'little boys room?'
Can you imagine a vampire on the rampage, having just sunk its teeth into a victim, having to  say.
"Oh, hang on a sec, I need to go for a P."
If you ever do as a comedy about vampires, that scenario ought to be in it. (And if you do want to make a comedy I could make a rough script for you to work on).

Added 13th October - In the film Nosferatu, a silent film, the vampires teeth are at the front whereas in subsequent films, when talking is done, the vampires teeth are positioned to the side.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2011, 01:17:14 am by Maidenscombe »

Maidenscombe

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Re: The best vampire in a film
« Reply #6 on: October 13, 2011, 01:28:41 am »
Rich 
Warning - possible spoiler alert.

here is a link to the song Flesh and Bone, from the film Suck.
It's all in the eyes.  Even the politicians agree - The eyes (I's) have it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HNJyqbJvwEM
 

Rich

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Re: The best vampire in a film
« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2011, 01:36:00 pm »
I think the size of the fangs are usually put down to either:

a) the 'generation' of the vampire. Early generation vampires are more bat-like and less human-like, but as the more people get bitten the less pronounced the features are of the vampire over the human. So: older vampires bat-like, newer vampires human-like; or

b) the amount of live human blood the vampire has drunk. In the case of the film 'Daywalkers', if they couldn't get blood they slowly but surely reverted back to their natural, raw form - a leathery-skinned creature with large teeth. Thus, the more prevalent their consumption, the more human they appeared and the smaller their teeth.

There is also the version of vampirism where the teeth extend as required so that they can communicate effectively but can also drink.

Of course, in reality, you are entirely right. With the advent of 'talkies' the size of vampire teeth shrunk to cater for the fact that their lead actors had difficulty speaking with a mouth full of unexpected teeth, plus it reduced the 'out of the ordinary' nature of the characters so that you were surprised when they turned out to be blood-suckers in the story.

Maidenscombe

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Re: The best vampire in a film
« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2011, 01:02:38 am »
Yes, I have been writing two vampire film scripts, in one The Vampire Demon Belac, Belac is the name of the fifth vampire inhabitant of the demon that first became vampire. As such she has all of the attributes of the original, that the demon's blood is toxic to humans. When a human is bitten it is infected with the demon and is soon tolerant of the demon's blood. That Belac still has the ability of showing why the vampires were known as the un-dead. When in moonlight they became skeletons.
As you say, as more human blood is added to the mix the vampires traits become less evident.
In my other film, Alacasia Alucard de Gothenberg, (having Goth in the name could be an indication she is a vampire, also, try spelling her second name backwards) the main character is bitten by a current descendant of evil (the evil before it became known as the devil). Its traits are that of a winged demon. Its powers of regeneration are very pronounced, when a finger is cut off it will grow back, also the actual finger will regenerate into the being it was. The more times that humans are taken into the fold, the less noticable are the traits until instead of becoming a winged demon they appear just like any other vampire, a bit bumpy around the eyes, larger teeth and those lovely eyes! (when you can still see the demon as it looks at you.)   

Rich

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Re: The best vampire in a film
« Reply #9 on: November 02, 2011, 06:10:15 pm »
Sounds interesting.

Maidenscombe

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Re: The best vampire in a film
« Reply #10 on: November 02, 2011, 11:55:43 pm »
Hi,
one of the things I've noted is how vampires in specific are changed a bit for every film. As far as I'm aware Dracula was written with him as a real nasty son of a bitch. In recent times though, they are portrayed as quite a bit nicer. They started out being the antagonist but now they are often the protagonist, or the hero.
(With mine I tried to give them qualities of the bad guy).
As with the tv/film vampire, each one is a little different. The Vampire Diaries has a couple of them walking about in the sun. 'Old' twinkle toes in Twilight, although we never actually saw Edward's  toes. The lumpy bumpy vamps in BTVS, give me the actual monsters again.

Scarecrow

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Re: The best vampire in a film
« Reply #11 on: November 09, 2011, 12:52:13 pm »


The best modern vampire film, without a doubt, and by a huge mileage, is Let the Right One In. If you have no seen this amazing Swedish film yet then you really, really should.



 - Scarecrow

Maidenscombe

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Re: The best vampire in a film
« Reply #12 on: November 09, 2011, 11:56:18 pm »
I've checked out the previews, and some other stuff, but I haven't found anything of a vampire. Can you give me a link?

mysticjim

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Re: The best vampire in a film
« Reply #13 on: November 11, 2011, 12:07:36 am »

The best modern vampire film, without a doubt, and by a huge mileage, is Let the Right One In. If you have no seen this amazing Swedish film yet then you really, really should.

 - Scarecrow

Been meaning to watch this for months.  Scarecrow, by any chance have you seen the English language remake, Let me In, it seems to have divided opinion as to which is best, although fans of the original book seem to prefer the Swedish movie.

Scarecrow

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Re: The best vampire in a film
« Reply #14 on: November 12, 2011, 11:01:52 am »

The best modern vampire film, without a doubt, and by a huge mileage, is Let the Right One In. If you have no seen this amazing Swedish film yet then you really, really should.

 - Scarecrow

Been meaning to watch this for months.  Scarecrow, by any chance have you seen the English language remake, Let me In, it seems to have divided opinion as to which is best, although fans of the original book seem to prefer the Swedish movie.


I have not seen the film yet but intend to. However, I have seen the trailer, and from that alone I can see that it's hugely Hollywood-influenced. i think it's a sense where Hollywood have fixed ideas of horror. So what's more naturalistic or subdued in the original, is make much more typical. And the fact that it's apparently a straight up remake of the film, rather than the book, renders it even more pointless to my mind. Just see the original and all its brilliance, I'd say. The remake, if you prefer horror to follow Hollywood conventions, then it'll be   successful in that mode, I'd imagine.


 - Scarecrow

 

anything